Friday, September 16, 2005

Friday Harry Potter'ing

Fiennes glad to be bad
By JOE NEUMAIERDAILY NEWS FEATURE WRITER


The typical Ralph Fiennes performance is often described as "distant" or "remote." So it's with unexpected relish that he describes his character in one of the four films he has upcoming: the villainous Lord Voldemort, who battles everyone's favorite boy wizard in "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire."

"That's one of the hardest things to play, the personification of evil!" exclaims Fiennes. "It's a full-on villain turn. You have to find a certain style or tone — you don't want to be either too campy or too understated. I thought of that old [standard] about Voldemort having an unhappy childhood." EDITOR’S NOTE: WELL HE DID, OF COURSE. (BUT THEN, BOOK 6 ALSO INFERS THERE’S SOME BAD BLOOD OR INBREEDING INVOLVED IN THE MIX AS WELL).

In addition to the November debut of "Harry," the British actor will be seen later this month in "Chumscrubber" as a suburban mayor who yearns to be an artist. He also currently stars in one of the best-reviewed films of the summer, "The Constant Gardener" — which opened two weeks ago — as a mild-mannered diplomat in Africa stirred to action by the murder of his wife. And then he'll be seen later this year as a blind American club owner in "The White Countess."

The son of a photographer and writer with five younger siblings (including fellow actor Joseph Fiennes, star of "Shakespeare in Love"), Fiennes grew up in England, where he had an artistic childhood. As a teenager, his love of the stage kicked in, and never left: In 1995, Fiennes became the first actor ever to win a Tony award for portraying Hamlet on Broadway.

The next year, he starred in the Best Picture winner "The English Patient," which followed his acclaimed work in "Schindler's List" and "Quiz Show." In the process, he was twice nominated for Oscars.

"Unlike other actors from his generation, Fiennes could be plunked down into a 1930s movie without a problem," says film historian and author David Thomson. "Even the pronunciation of his first name is from a more elegant time. The fact that he pronounces it 'Rafe' harks back to another era, but that suits him."

"Chumscrubber" director Arie Posin says he wanted Fiennes to play a dreamy, artistic character because he always seems to have a quirky sense of hopefulness.

"Even in his very serious performances, that childlike quality is there," says Posin. "He can walk that line."

One genre Fiennes wouldn't mind trying again is romantic comedy. Though 2002's "Maid inManhattan," in which his distant and remote politician fell for a Bronx hotel housekeeper (Jennifer Lopez), made almost $100 million at the box office, Fiennes thinks the chemistry wasn't there. EDITOR’S NOTE: WELL, PLAYING OPPOSITE JLO HAS GOT TO BE LIKE TRYING TO FIND CHEMISTRY WITH YOUR WALLPAPER. FIENNES WAS CUTE, THOUGH. (YES….ANOTHER SHAMEFUL CONFESSION. I SAW THE MOVIE).

P.S. I THINK WE SNUCK IN AFTER PAYING FOR A “STAR TREK” MOVIE. (OF COURSE PAYING FOR SOME OF THE LATEST “TREK” FILMS ALSO SORT OF REQUIRES A SHAMEFUL MEA CULPA, I GUESS).

"That was a sort of Prince Charming role, and I find it hard to find the right variation on that," he says. "I love romantic comedies, but I guess I'm not the first choice!"

Large photo of Harry and Hermione hugging
MTV has posted a high-resolution still from the latest GOF preview, which depicts Harry and Hermione in a tight embrace, while (most likely) Rita Skeeter and her photographer Bozo take some photos

1 Comments:

Anonymous Andy Tatem said...

it was pretty awesome.

1:07 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home